Recent Fire Damage Posts

We Act Fast To Limit More Damage To Your Stony Brook Home After A Fire

8/27/2019 (Permalink)

kitchen with drywall and insulation covering every surface This was the aftermath of a kitchen fire and there was significant smoke and soot damage. We arrived right away and began restoration.

Innovations in Deodorization that Help Stony Brook Residences After Fire Damage

The smoke and soot that spread throughout your Stony Brook home after a fire cause many different kinds of damage. Our prompt use of restoration industry best practices mitigates or stop the progressive deterioration highly corrosive fire residues can inflict on structural components and contents. We then work on remediation, returning as many surfaces and fixtures to preloss condition as possible by cleaning and clearing away debris. 

Lingering Odors an Unwanted Reminder of Fire Damage

One of the biggest fire damage challenges a Stony Brook homeowner faces is the stench that can persist long after all exterior and interior damage is restored. The tiny bits of incompletely combusted building materials and contents that are the solids in smoke and soot carry the odor. Because they are so small, it can be very difficult to eradicate all of them. Thus, malodors endure. Smells are very evocative, reminding you and your family of the fear, worry, and disruption of the fire if not eliminated.

Deodorization Is a Multi-Step Process

SERVPRO utilizes a malodor abatement protocol that eventually takes care of the smells after fire damage. We know that the perception of odors is a very individual thing, so we use many strategies until you and your family are satisfied. We start by finding and disposing of all charred items, searching until these “bigger” odor-holders are out the door. Deep cleaning of solid and porous surfaces deals with surface and absorbed odors, the latter of which can vaporize out of the pores of wood or fibers. We inspect your HVAC system as well, arranging for cleaning if sooty debris is inside, ready to move from space to space in the ductwork.

Sealing In Odor Is an Option

If structures are sound but seem to emit fire-related smells even after deep cleaning, sealing is a possibility to prevent odors from vaporizing. Hard to reach recesses in the ductwork also might profit from sealing. 

Advanced Deodorization Techniques

If a thorough cleaning does not do the trick and sealing is impractical, SERVPRO utilizes equipment like thermal foggers, ozone machines, or hydroxyl generators. These resources emit particles that seek out and pair with the odiferous smoke solids, neutralizing the smell through chemical changes at the molecular level. This approach can be successful with airborne smells and malodorous particles that settled and even worked their way into fabrics, cracks, or crevices.

SERVPRO of Port Jefferson offers a range of deodorization solutions when smoky and protein-based smells continue to pervade your home even after mitigation and remediation. Call us at (631) 476-5300 to set up a consultation including a thorough fire damage odor elimination work up.

See more about Stony Brook.

Call The Experts At Fire Damage Remediation in Setauket Today

6/15/2019 (Permalink)

A nice fire in the fireplace can turn sour very quickly and cause serious fire damage. Contact SERVPRO today for all remediation needs.

Crucial Stages when Restoring Fire Damage in Setauket

When fire razes any property, it leaves widespread destruction and therefore restoring your Setauket home to its preloss state after such an incident takes different steps. Some stages in the process are crucial to the outcome and therefore require keenness. Our professional fire damage restoration service can help resolve the crisis after such incidents eliminating traces of damage "Like it never even happened."

It is only possible to fix fire damage in Setauket effectively if all types of damages are identified. Apart from charring and soot on surfaces, fire also leaves other types of damages, including seared materials, invisible smoke deposits, and residues that penetrate beyond the surface. We have IICRC certified FSRT, Fire and Smoke Restoration Technicians at SERVPRO who carry out a wide range of checks. We check residue deposit patterns on surfaces starting close to the fire source. We also check the level of damage on items and separate them into categories of salvageable, unsalvageable, and questionable items.

Removing damaged materials from the affected areas helps create room for the restoration processes. Since flames affect building materials and contents as well, debris removal involves some level of tear down. The damaged materials also require proper containment; otherwise, they would scatter, complicating the disposal process. Our SERVPRO technicians have the skill to perform teardown without causing unnecessary damage. We also have waste bins and heavy-duty plastic bags to prevent unnecessary scattering.

The combination of residues from the combustion process, the water used to fight the fire and the shuffling of people in and out of a loss site leave it filthy. A thorough cleanup is, therefore, necessary for the home to be habitable. Our SERVPRO technicians use wet and dry methods to clean different materials. We also use specialized cleaning methods such as soda blasting which offers deodorization qualities and also helps restore charred surfaces without causing further damages.

In case of fire loss, SERVPRO of Port Jefferson can help manage the restoration process. You can reach us at (631) 476-5300 any time.

Click here to see more about Setuaket.

Our Specialists Were Able To Restore A Damaged Fireplace In Port Jefferson

6/5/2019 (Permalink)

Fireplace restoration is just one of many services we can provide to return your home to preloss conditions.

How Our Port Jefferson Fire Damage Team Restored This Fireplace

Opening your flue allows oxygen into the fireplace, letting it burn more efficiently. It also plays a part in decreasing the amount of carbon dioxide and smoke in the room by channeling it through the dampers- small steel shutters inside your chimney. Forgetting to open the flue before igniting your fire could cause emissions to back up, resulting in soots and smoke being spat out from your fireplace.

One of the customers who forgot to open their flue caused severe fire damage in Port Jefferson. The main concern for them was that their stunning stone fireplace had taken the brunt of the damage and a wholesale replacement could have cost thousands of dollars in removing the existing fireplace, ordering a new one and installation fees. Our team was able to rectify much of the damage using SERVPRO's patented Mason cleaner.

By phoning professionals, this customer ensured that no further damage was caused. Most household cleaners are unable to remediate thick smokes or soot damage effectively. Attempting to clear away soiling from a fire like this could have resulted in spreading soot around, causing harm to floors, walls, and masonry. SERVPRO technicians are equipped with the expertise and the equipment to give your home the best chance of returning to its preloss condition.

As you can see, most of the damage sustained was confined to the upper half of the fireplace. That's because smoke rises upwards, traveling into clean air pockets. There is a heavy soot deposit because the shut flue increased the air pressure inside the chimney. High-pressure fires cause more problems because smoke residues are forced deeper into the surface and can eat away at the finish.

We needed to use an aggressive cleaning product to tackle the heavy set soot but also one that was non-corrosive and would not damage the finish of the stone behind it. Our technicians have access to a full range of chemical agents, including patented cleaners that are not available from any other company. By using SERVPRO's mason cleaner, we successful restored the damage and saved the customer from an expensive replacement.

Fireplace restoration is just one of many services we can provide to return your home to preloss conditions. Contact SERVPRO of Port Jefferson at (631) 476-5300.

Click here for more about Port Jefferson.

Red Flag Warning

4/4/2019 (Permalink)

What is a Red Flag Warning!?

Red Flag warning means warm temperatures, very low humidities and stronger winds are expected to combine to produce an increased risk of fire danger. 

Red fag warning are issued to inform area firefighting and land management agencies that conditions are ideal for wildland fire combustion.

If you are allowed to burn in your area, all burn barrels must be covered with a weighted metal cover, with holes no larger than 3/4 of an inch.

  • Do not throw cigarettes or matches out of a moving vehicle. They may ignite dry grass on the side of the road and become a wildfire. 
  • Extinguish all outdoor fires properly. Drown fires with plenty of water and stir to make sure everything is cold to the touch. Dunk charcoal in water until cold. Do not throw live charcoal on the ground and leave it.
  • Never leave a fire unattended. Sparks or embers can blow into leaves or grass, ignite a fire, and quickly spread. 

Smoke Damage After a Fire

3/27/2019 (Permalink)

Smoke Damage After a Fire

Residential and commercial fires can be devastating. Even a minor fire can cause major damage to a property. What most people may not realize is that the actual flames are only one part of the damage that occurs during a fire. Many times, smoke damage is significantly worse.

Smoke is a byproduct of most fires, leaving your home or business smelling like charcoal. Smoke is visible because it contains tiny particles of carbon and other materials and becomes trapped in fabrics, upholstery, and carpeting.

Oftentimes smoke can cause headaches or make you feel physically ill. For those with asthma, allergies, or chronic lung diseases, odors from smoke and fires can increase your symptoms or cause sudden attacks.

Cleaning and Deodorizing Smoke Damage

While you may be able to clean and deodorize smoke damage on your own, prolonged exposure increases the chances of lingering odors. Since smoke can travel much further than flames, it may be necessary to clean and deodorize several rooms or your entire property.

Smoke restoration is the process of removing smoke odors after a fire. The exact deodorization process will vary depending on the extent of the fire smell and the type of materials involved.

Upholstery and fabrics are often dry cleaned with special chemical deodorizers to neutralize the smell. Carpeting is often treated with deodorizing chemicals, then either steam or dry cleaned. Porous materials like drywall and wood often require ozone treatments to completely remove fire smells.

Smoke odors may persist even after cleaning up soot and fire damage. Successfully deodorizing after a fire requires immediate action. These actions may include treating surfaces with commercial deodorizing chemicals specifically designed to neutralize smoke smells.

For persistent or overwhelming smoky smells, it may be necessary to use an ozone generator. These machines produce ozone (O3) molecules that help to remove fire and smoke odors.

SERVPRO is an experienced smoke damage restoration company. Our crews are experienced in cleaning and deodorizing smoke smells after a fire.

SERVPRO’s technicians use commercial grade equipment to remove smoke odors and clean fire damage. From carpeting and upholstery to walls and cabinets, we will deodorize your home or business after smoke damage.

Let SERVPRO of Port Jefferson give you peace of mind in an emergency. Call 631-476-5300

Know Your Policy Before Disaser Strikes

3/22/2019 (Permalink)

What happens when you are standing on your front lawn watching the fire department attempt to save your burning house? Your first thought is: is my home salvageable? Your second thought is: will the insurance company cover this? You think to yourself that you must call your agent and a reputable company that is familiar with this type of loss, which is SERVPRO. Our professionals have worked for many years to help make fire damage “Like it never even happened.”

If your home is destroyed and uninhabitable, ensure that your homeowner’s policy has a loss clause that covers living expenses. You will need living expenses while your home is being repaired or rebuilt. Many people do not know their insurance policies well enough to advocate for themselves with their insurance company. Knowledge is the best protection. Be sure that you know what you are and are not covered for before a disaster strikes.

SERVPRO will not only be able to restore your home, but our knowledgeable Project Managers are well-versed in insurance coverage. SERVPRO works with all insurance companies and will communicate directly with your adjuster to ensure that you are back in your own home as quickly as possible. Our PM’s will help guide you as best they can during this extremely stressful time, and our expert and compassionate crew will get you back on your feet in no time.

Safe Home For The Holidays

12/12/2018 (Permalink)

Updated November 30, 2018.

The holiday season is here! No matter if you celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa or all three, we’re excited to share in the holiday spirit. It’s easy to get caught up in the festivities, and while you’re busy decorating the house, safety may be one of the last things on your mind.

According to the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), there were 15,000 injuries related to holiday decorations in 2012. Mishaps send about 250 people to the ER daily, with falls, cuts and back strains topping the list of injuries. To ensure you have a safe, healthy, and happy holiday season with your friends and family, here are 12 tips to keep in mind as you deck out your home:

1. Keep live trees away from heat sources.

Place your tree away from fireplaces and heaters, and keep a fire extinguisher near your tree. Live trees are highly flammable, due to needles and sap.

2. Hydrate your tree.

A dried-out tree can catch fire faster than one that has been properly watered. Check the water level every other day to ensure proper hydration. Starting with a green tree is one way to keep it from drying out so quickly.

3. Fake it!

If you buy an artificial tree, make sure it’s labeled “fire resistant.” Fire-resistant trees are less susceptible to catching fire.

4. Don’t burn wrapping paper in the fireplace.

Paper can catch fire very quickly and can cause flash fires. Instead, recycle (or better yet, reuse!) your wrapping paper.

5. Work as a team.

When stringing lights and decorations above your normal reach, make sure you use a proper ladder with someone supporting the base.

6. Double-check your lights for safety.

Replace any lights with frayed wires, broken sockets, and loose connections. The CPSC issued new guidelines for seasonal light safety in 2015, setting a minimum wire size, and standards for strain relief and over-current protection.

7. Power down before you turn in.

Turn off all lights when you go to bed and before leaving the house to avoid a short that could start an electrical fire.

8. Prevent electrical cord damage.

Don’t mount lights in a way that might damage the cords, and avoid using nails or tacks. Use hooks or insulated staples instead.

9. Secure candles.

Keep candles on a sturdy base to prevent tipping. Never leave a lit candle unattended.

10. Use unbreakable ornaments.

If you have fragile ornament, place them out of reach from pets and kids.

11. Skip the fake food.

Avoid decorations that look like candy or food if you have young children — or pets — in the house.

12. Beware of poisonous plants.

While festive, poinsettias are poisonous when eaten, so keep them out of reach of kids and pets.

Happy holidays!

Source:

The One Medical blog is published by One Medical, an innovative primary care practice with offices in BostonChicagoLos AngelesNew YorkPhoenix, the San Francisco Bay AreaSeattle, and Washington, DC.

Any general advice posted on our blog, website, or app is for informational purposes only and is not intended to replace or substitute for any medical or other advice. The One Medical Group entities and 1Life Healthcare, Inc. make no representations or warranties and expressly disclaim any and all liability concerning any treatment, action by, or effect on any person following the general information offered or provided within or through the blog, website, or app. If you have specific concerns or a situation arises in which you require medical advice, you should consult with an appropriately trained and qualified medical services provider.

Distinguishing Common Fire Extinguishers

7/24/2018 (Permalink)

Fire extinguishers are a standard household item. However, not all extinguishers are made equally. Many different kinds of extinguishers are made to fight specific classes of fire. Here is a list and description of common fire extinguishers.
Water: Water extinguishers are used on Class A fires, that start when ordinary combustibles like wood and paper ignite. It is best not to use water extinguishers on electrical fires, as the water can damage the appliance.
AFFF Foam: This type of fire extinguisher is highly effective on class A and B fires. When extinguishing a class B fire that involves gasoline, the foam helps to prevent reignition. Some of these extinguishers may be used on or near electrical appliances, check to see if the extinguisher has been dielectrically tested before use on electrical equipment.
Carbon Dioxide (CO2): This extinguisher can be used on class B fires or class F fires. This extinguisher works by cutting off the oxygen supply to the fire and does not leave residue behind.
ABC Powder: This type of extinguisher is versatile across classes A, B, C, and electrical fires. However, it is recommended not to use ABC Powder in a small or confined room due to the risk of inhalation.
Water Mist: Water mist extinguishers are used to put out A, B, C, F, and electrical fires. "The unique design of the water mist extinguishers' supersonic nozzle creates a microscopic mist curtain, reducing the oxygen content. Water mist extinguishers are also safe on fires caused by electricity, as the water mist does not conduct electricity and the water mist does not form puddles which could lead to electrocution" (Safelincs, 2018).
Wet Chemical: Wet Chemical fire extinguishers are specifically designed to put out class F fires that involve cooking oil and fats. Some of these extinguishers may be used on class A fires as well.
If you or anyone you know is having a fire emergency call SERVPRO of Port Jefferson for immediate emergency services. Staying safe and staying educated on fire safety can help you keep yourself, your family, and your home safe.

Different Classes of Fire

7/20/2018 (Permalink)

There are many different classes of fire based on what fuels the flames. Even though there are a variety of fires, all fires are dangerous. The first step in protecting yourself, your family, and your home from different types of fires is understanding what fuels them and what extinguishes them.
Class A fires are fueled by ordinary combustible materials like wood, paper, fabric, and most kinds of trash. Class A fires typically start at campsites, kitchens, backyards, schools, and forests. If a Class A fire does start and has not spread, pouring water or cutting off the oxygen supply will extinguish the fire.
Please call 911 in case of a fire emergency, then call SERVPRO to help start the restoration process.
Flammable liquid and gas fuel class B fires. Not to be confused with a greasy kitchen fire, Class B fires start when gasoline catches fire. When a Class B fire starts never pour water directly onto the fire, due to gasoline's hydrophobic makeup the water will cause the fuel to spread, thus making the fire spread. Extinguishing these fires should be left to professionals. However, if that is not an immediate possibility, a CO2 extinguisher will effectively stop the fire.
Please call 911 in case of a fire emergency, then call SERVPRO to help start the restoration process.
Electrical fires are categorized as a Class C fire. With the absence of an energized electronic device, it is classified differently. A Class C fire is extinguished the same as a Class A fire.
When cooking anything with grease, a Class K fire is possible. This class of fire starts when oil, grease, or vegetable fat ignites. Similar to the aforementioned Class B fire, never pour water on a Class K fire. Grease and oil repel water, and by pouring water directly onto the fire, it will cause the fire to spread. You can extinguish this fire by cutting off its oxygen supply with a CO2 extinguisher, but these fires need to be left to professionals.
Please call 911 in case of a fire emergency, then call SERVPRO to help start the restoration process.
Being educated about what to do and what not to do for different classes of fire can help you protect yourself, your family, and your home from disastrous fire damage.

Fire safety for kids: Prepare, practice and prevent

3/19/2018 (Permalink)

  • PREPARE – Reduce the risk of fires in your home by eliminating hazards.

  • PRACTICE – Practice a home fire evacuation plan and general fire safety practices.

  • PREVENT – The Unthinkable.

It takes about two minutes for a small flame to turn into a life threatening fire and just five minutes for a fire to engulf an entire home, according to Ready.gov. Putting in place fire prevention measures to avoid a home fire altogether is the best fire safety practice.

While prevention isn’t a 100 percent guarantee, there are many precautions you can take in your home to reduce fire hazards and keep your kids safe. Follow these recommendations to address common household fire hazards and protect your family from a home fire catching in your home:

  • Don’t overload electric outlets, extension cords or wall sockets. Stringing multiple extension cords together in order to plug several appliances into the same outlet is a bad idea.

  • Reduce clutter. This is especially important in the kitchen, where dish towels, sponges, paper towels, and other items can catch fire if placed too close to a hot stove. But it’s also important in all areas of your home – blankets and clothing piled up against a heat run, for instance, can also pose a fire hazard. As a rule, keep combustible materials at least three feet from the stove burners, and never leave cooking unattended.

  • Don’t leave burning candles unattended. A candle can fall for a multitude of reasons, lighting carpets, curtains or furniture ablaze. This can also happen if a candle is allowed to burn down too low, causing its glass container to break and freeing the flame.

  • Hide all matches and lighters out of reach of young children. Even responsible children can accidentally light a fire if they encounter a lighter or match and try it out of curiosity. It’s best to place these items well out of reach of kids.

  • Always have multiple working fire extinguishers conveniently located in your home. You should always have a fire extinguisher in the kitchen, for instance, as it’s a common location for fires to occur from cooking and other hazards.

  • Replace circuit breakers with arc-fault circuit interrupters. These gadgets pick up on electrical arcs, usually caused by poor insulation or loose wires or connections, and halt them before they lead to fires.

  • Replace electrical outlets. Faulty electrical outlets can be a source of home fires, too. If plugs seem to be loose or fall out, the blades inside may have loosened. Loose blades create excessive heat, which can lead to fires.

  • Give your clothes dryer proper maintenance. Cleaning the lint catcher thoroughly with every load is just the starting point. Over time, lint and other particles can build up in the vent system or dryer cabinet (where the heating element is located) and potentially cause fires. Having your dryer cabinet professionally cleaned every two years can also reduce potential fire risks.

  • Keep an eye on garage safety. Heated garages pose another threat to your home’s safety. If your garage contains a workshop, where even a thin layer of sawdust is present, and a heating appliance – whether a portable kerosene heater, wood stove, coal stove or anything else – there’s a fire risk. Sawdust is easily combustible, so employ a heavy-duty vacuum like a Shop Vac to remove as much sawdust as possible.

For more information check out https://www.safety.com/kids-fire-safety/

Fireplace Safety

2/13/2018 (Permalink)

Fireplace Safety Tips

  • If possible, keep a window cracked open while the fire is burning.
  • Be certain the damper or flue is open before starting a fire. Keeping the damper or flue open until the fire is out will draw smoke out of the house. The damper can be checked by looking up into the chimney with a flashlight or mirror. Do not close the damper until the embers have completely stopped burning.
  • Use dry and well-aged wood. Wet or green wood causes more smoke and contributes to soot buildup in the chimney. Dried wood burns with less smoke and burns more evenly,
  • Smaller pieces of wood placed on a grate burn faster and produce less smoke.
  • Clean out ashes from previous fires. Levels of ash at the base of the fireplace should be kept to 1 inch or less because a thicker layer restricts the air supply to logs, resulting in more smoke.
  • The chimney should be checked annually by a professional. Even if the chimney is not due for cleaning, it is important to check for animal nests or other blockages that could prevent smoke from escaping.

For more tips check them out here!

Fall Fire Safety Tips

11/9/2017 (Permalink)

As summer turns to fall, it's a good idea to refresh your memory on fall fire safety tips. Some safety tips are the same regardless of the time of year, but many safety concerns are seasonal, particularly those that involve keeping your home warm.

Time Changes Mean Battery Changes

Get in the habit of changing the batteries in your smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors every fall and spring when changing the clocks for Daylight Savings Time. It is also a good idea to make it standard procedure in your household to verify that all fire extinguishers are fully charged and in working order when you adjust the clocks each season.

Home Heating Tips

No matter what type of device you use to heat your home, making sure your heating devices and/or systems are in good working order is an important part of learning some fall fire safety tips. Many things can go wrong with heating equipment during the spring and summer months. Verify that everything you need to keep your home warm throughout fall and winter is in good working order before you experience the first cold snap of the season.

 

Central Heating System Safety Tips

  • Get your central heating system cleaned, inspected and serviced by a certified HVAC (heating, venting and air conditioning) contractor every year before using it.
  • If you have a gas heater, make sure that you have a sufficient quantity of fully functioning carbon monoxide detectors installed in your home.

Space Heater Safety Tips

  • Make sure that any space heaters are surrounded by at least three feet of empty space.
  • Never place clothing or any other objects on a space heater to dry.
  • Do not place space heaters near furniture or drapery.
  • Turn space heaters off when you leave the house or go to bed.
  • Avoid storing any combustible items near heaters.

Fireplace Safety Tips

  • Get your chimney inspected each year to make sure that it is safe.
  • Hire a chimney sweep to clean out your chimney every fall.
  • Repair any cracks in fireplaces.
  • Use fireplace screens to keep sparks and fire debris inside the fireplace.
  • Do not every use gasoline to start a fire in the fireplace.
  • Never leave a fire unattended.
  • Make sure that combustible materials are not stored within three feet of your fireplace.
  • For natural gas fireplaces, get all connections and lines inspected before use each season.
  • Remember that outdoor fireplaces can be just as dangerous as indoor units, and observe all safety precautions when using them.

Home Fires

10/19/2017 (Permalink)

In just two minutes, a fire can become life-threatening. In five minutes, a residence can be engulfed in flames.

Learn About Fires

  • Fire is FAST! In less than 30 seconds a small flame can turn into a major fire. It only takes minutes for thick black smoke to fill a house or for it to be engulfed in flames.
  • Fire is HOT! Heat is more threatening than flames. Room temperatures in a fire can be 100 degrees at floor level and rise to 600 degrees at eye level. Inhaling this super-hot air will scorch your lungs and melt clothes to your skin.
  • Fire is DARK! Fire starts bright, but quickly produces black smoke and complete darkness.
  • Fire is DEADLY! Smoke and toxic gases kill more people than flames do. Fire produces poisonous gases that make you disoriented and drowsy. Asphyxiation is the leading cause of fire deaths, exceeding burns by a three-to-one ratio.

Before a Fire

Create and Practice a Fire Escape Plan

In the event of a fire, remember that every second counts, so you and your family must always be prepared. Escape plans help you get out of your home quickly.

Twice each year, practice your home fire escape plan.  Some tips to consider when preparing this plan include:

  • Find two ways to get out of each room in the event the primary way is blocked by fire or smoke.
  • A secondary route might be a window onto a neighboring roof or a collapsible ladder for escape from upper story windows.
  • Make sure that windows are not stuck, screens can be taken out quickly, and that security bars can be properly opened.
  • Practice feeling your way out of the house in the dark or with your eyes closed.
  • Teach children not to hide from firefighters.

Smoke Alarms

A working smoke alarm significantly increases your chances of surviving a deadly home fire.

  • Install both ionization AND photoelectric smoke alarms, OR dual sensor smoke alarms, which contain both ionization and photoelectric smoke sensors.
  • Test batteries monthly.
  • Replace batteries in battery-powered and hard-wired smoke alarms at least once a year (except non-replaceable 10-year lithium batteries).
  • Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement, both inside and outside of sleeping areas.
  • Replace the entire smoke alarm unit every 8-10 years or according to manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Never disable a smoke alarm while cooking – it can be a deadly mistake.

Smoke Alarm Safety for People with Access or Functional Needs

  • Audible alarms for visually impaired people should pause with a small window of silence between each successive cycle so that they can listen to instructions or voices of others.
  • Smoke alarms with a vibrating pad or flashing light are available for the hearing impaired. Contact your local fire department for information about obtaining a flashing or vibrating smoke alarm.
  • Smoke alarms with a strobe light outside the home to catch the attention of neighbors, and emergency call systems for summoning help, are also available.

More Fire Safety Tips

  • Make digital copies of valuable documents and records like birth certificates.
  • Sleep with your door closed.
  • Contact your local fire department for information on training on the proper use and maintenance of fire extinguishers.
  • Consider installing an automatic fire sprinkler system in your residence.

During a Fire

  • Crawl low under any smoke to your exit - heavy smoke and poisonous gases collect first along the ceiling.
  • Before opening a door, feel the doorknob and door. If either is hot, or if there is smoke coming around the door, leave the door closed and use your second way out.
  • If you open a door, open it slowly. Be ready to shut it quickly if heavy smoke or fire is present.
  • If you can’t get to someone needing assistance, leave the home and call 9-1-1 or the fire department. Tell the emergency operator where the person is located.
  • If pets are trapped inside your home, tell firefighters right away.
  • If you can’t get out, close the door and cover vents and cracks around doors with cloth or tape to keep smoke out.  Call 9-1-1 or your fire department. Say where you are and signal for help at the window with a light-colored cloth or a flashlight.
  • If your clothes catch fire, stop, drop, and roll – stop immediately, drop to the ground, and cover your face with your hands.  Roll over and over or back and forth until the fire is out.  If you or someone else cannot stop, drop, and roll, smother the flames with a blanket or towel.  Use cool water to treat the burn immediately for 3 to 5 minutes.  Cover with a clean, dry cloth.  Get medical help right away by calling 9-1-1 or the fire department.

Fire Escape Planning for Older Adults and People with Access or Functional Needs

  • Live near an exit. You'll be safest on the ground floor if you live in an apartment building. If you live in a multi-story home, arrange to sleep on the ground floor, and near an exit.
  • If you use a walker or wheelchair, check all exits to be sure you get through the doorways.
  • Make any necessary accommodations, such as providing exit ramps and widening doorways, to facilitate an emergency escape.
  • Speak to your family members, building manager, or neighbors about your fire safety plan and practice it with them.
  • Contact your local fire department's non-emergency line and explain your special needs. Ask emergency providers to keep your special needs information on file.
  • Keep a phone near your bed and be ready to call 911 or your local emergency number if a fire occurs.

After a Fire

The following checklist serves as a quick reference and guide for you to follow after a fire strikes.

  • Contact your local disaster relief service, such as The Red Cross, if you need temporary housing, food and medicines.
  • If you are insured, contact your insurance company for detailed instructions on protecting the property, conducting inventory and contacting fire damage restoration companies.  If you are not insured, try contacting private organizations for aid and assistance.
  • Check with the fire department to make sure your residence is safe to enter. Be watchful of any structural damage caused by the fire.
  • The fire department should see that utilities are either safe to use or are disconnected before they leave the site.  DO NOT attempt to reconnect utilities yourself.
  • Conduct an inventory of damaged property and items.  Do not throw away any damaged goods until after an inventory is made.
  • Try to locate valuable documents and records.  Refer to information on contacts and the replacement process inside this brochure.
  • Begin saving receipts for any money you spend related to fire loss.  The receipts may be needed later by the insurance company and for verifying losses claimed on income tax.
  • Notify your mortgage company of the fire.

SERVPRO of Port Jefferson & The American Red Cross

2/28/2017 (Permalink)

 

Have questions? – We’re Here To Help®

Stamp out home fires, let's make it

"Like it never even happened"

SERVPRO of Port Jefferson’s continued commitment to the American Red Cross by supporting the disaster responder with an emphasis on the home fire preparedness campaign. The home fire preparedness campaign aligns with SERVPRO of Port Jefferson’s aim at reducing home fire deaths and injuries across the United States

Be informed, be aware, be safe

For more information on children and fire safety Check out the American Red Cross Website.

Www.redcross.org/homefires

Have questions? – We’re Here to Help®

Fire safety escape plans and more: Don't Hesitate Call SERVPRO of Port Jefferson:631-476-5300

24 Hours a day/ 7 days a week/ 365 days a year

 email: sales@SERVPROofportjefferson.com  

Home Fire Safety Tips for Winter

1/18/2017 (Permalink)

 Did you know that home fires occur more often in the winter than during any other season? Make sure you take the necessary safety precautions. Here are some fire safety tips to follow:

Furnace 

• Keep trash and other combustibles away from the furnace.
• Hire a professional to inspect and maintain your furnace . Inspections ensure that all furnace controls and functions are in good working order. 
• If your furnace breaks leave repairs to a knowledgeable professional.

Fireplace 

• Have the chimney inspected and cleaned once a year. The best time to do this is in the fall before the snow and cold weather hits.
• Close the glass doors or set a mesh metal screen in front of a lit fireplace to prevent embers from jumping out and unwanted materials from falling in.
• Keep blankets, clothing and other combustible materials away from the fireplace.
• Build a small fire and add logs as necessary to keep the fire going. Avoid using excess amounts of paper when starting a fire.
• Never burn charcoal in the fireplace since this gives off high amounts of carbon monoxide.
• Put out the fire before you go to sleep.
• Never close the fireplace damper with hot ashes in the fireplace. Once the ashes cool, store them outside in a tightly sealed metal container at least 10 feet from the house.

Portable Space Heater

• Plug space heaters directly into the wall; avoid using extension cords if possible. Also, plug only one space heater into an outlet at a time. Plugging two in together could overload the circuit.
• Keep space heaters at least three feet away from anything combustible, including bedding, clothing and drapes.
• Check power cords occasionally for fraying or breakage. Never operate a space heater with a damaged cord.
• Turn off the space heater when you leave home or go to sleep. Never leave it running unattended.
• Never hang gloves, socks or other items over a space heater to dry.
• Never run a space heater in the bathroom or other damp area where it could come in contact with water.

Stove and Oven 

• Keep an ABC fire extinguisher under the kitchen sink. ABC stands for “ash”, “barrel”, and “current”. An ABC fire extinguisher is capable of handling trash, wood and paper fires (ash); cooking oil, gasoline, and other flammable liquid fires (barrel); and electrical equipment fires (current). 
• If a fire extinguisher isn’t available, put out stovetop grease fires with liberal amounts of salt and baking soda, not water.
• Never leave the oven or stove on as supplementary heat for your home.
• Don’t cook if you are sleepy or have been drinking alcohol.
• Never leave the kitchen while frying, grilling, boiling or broiling.
• Set a timer to remind you when food is done cooking.
• Keep anything that could catch fire away from the stove top.

Candles

• Burn candles in sturdy holders and set them on a stable surface.
• Keep candles one foot away from anything that could catch fire.
• Blow out candles when you go to sleep or leave home. Avoid burning candles in the bedroom where you could fall asleep with them still lit.
• Never leave a child unattended with a burning candle.
• Store matches and lighters out of reach of children.

Smoke Alarm

• Install a smoke alarm on every floor of your home, including inside bedrooms and outside each sleeping area.
• Change the batteries in the smoke alarm once a year. It's helpful to set a schedule to do this at the same time annually, for example when the clocks change for daylight savings time.  
• Test smoke alarms monthly. Simply press the “test” button and wait for the alarm to sound. If the alarm doesn’t go off, change the batteries and try again. If the alarm still doesn’t work, replace it as soon as possible.

SERVPRO of Port Jefferson - Fire Safety Tips

11/2/2016 (Permalink)

According to the US Fire Loss Clock, in 2015, a fire department responded to a fire every 23 seconds.  Structural fires were reported every 63 seconds.  Tragically, fires claimed an average of seven lives per day.

Though some fire are unavoidable acts of nature or unpredictable accidents, many fires in the home and workplace are avoidable.  The following tips can help reduce the likelihood of a fire in your home or business.

1.     Watch your cooking. Stay in the kitchen if you are frying, grilling or broiling food.  Never allow young children around the stove or oven, especially if they are not closely attended.

2.     Give space heaters space. Keep space heaters at least three feet from anything that is flammable.

3.     Smoke outside. If you must smoke inside, have a sturdy, deep ashtray.  Never smoke in bed.

4.     Keep matches and lighters out of reach. Keep matches and lighters in high cabinets, preferably under a child lock.

5.     Inspect electrical cords. Replace cords that are cracked, damaged, have broken plugs or have loose connections.

6.     Be careful when using candles. Keep candles at least one foot from anything that can burn.  Blow them out before you leave the room or go to sleep.

7.     Have a fire escape plan. Make a fire escape plan and practice it at least twice a year.

8.     Install smoke alarms. Install alarms on every level of your home or office and inside bedrooms.  Interconnect them so they all sound at once.

9.     Test smoke alarms. Test alarms once a month.  Replace batteries once per year or as needed.

10.   Install sprinklers. Sprinklers can help maintain and sometimes even extinguish fires, giving your local fire department a better chance of saving your property.

In the event of a disaster do not hesitate to Call SERVPRO of Port Jefferson's  professionals in for your cleanup and restoration needs. (631)476-5300. 

Staying Safe this Summer

6/22/2016 (Permalink)

Each Summer, families and friends across the country enjoy the summer months with barbecues, camping trips, or by cooling off in the pool, lake or beach. In order to enjoy these occasions, it is important to keep safety top of mind to ensure you have fun in the sun. 

According to the United States Fire Administration, just under 8,600 Americans are injured by fireworks and almost 5,000 are injured by charcoal/wood-burning and propane grill fires, annually. A barbecue grill should always be supervised when in use. Keep children and pets a safe distance from the grilling area to prevent accidental burns or tipping of the grill.

If you enjoy lounging by the pool or going for a boat ride to cool off from the summer sun, make sure you exercise caution, especially when children are present. Only swim in approved areas and supervise children at all times when near the water.

Summertime should be a time to make memories and enjoy the great outdoors. The following tips provided by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) , will help keep you safe all summer long.

•When using a charcoal grill, only use starter fluids designed for barbecue grills; do not add fluid after coals have been lit.

•When using a gas grill, ensure the hose connection is tight; check hoses for leaks. Applying soapy water to hoses will easily and safely reveal any leaks.

•Always wear a U.S. Coast Guard - Approved PFD (personal floatation device) when boating, jet-skiing, tubing or water-skiing, air -filled swimming aids, like water wings or inner tubes, are not substitutes for approved PFDs. An adult should always supervise children using these devices.

•Be sure to extinguish all smoking materials and shut down motors and heating devices before fueling a boat, In case of a spill, wipe up fuel and check for fuel leakage and odors.

•When camping, always use a flame retardant tent and set up camp far away from the campfire. Only use flashlights or battery-powered lanterns inside the tent, not liquid-filled heaters or lanterns.

•Always build a campfire downwind from the tent area. Clear vegetation and dig a pit before building your campfire. Always extinguish the fire before going to sleep or leaving the campsite. To extinguish, cover with dirt or pour water over the fire.

•Store liquid fire starter (not gasoline) away from your tent and campfire and only use dry kindling to freshen a campfire.

 •Consider leaving firework use to trained professionals. Stay back at least 500 feet from professional fireworks displays.

SERVPRO of Port Jefferson is Wishing you a Safe and Happy Summer.

Call Today: 631-476-5300

A Fire in one office can damage a whole business

4/21/2016 (Permalink)

In 2004, direct property loss due to fires was estimated at 9.8 billion dollars. However, when one of your properties suffers a fire, only one fire matters. Business documents are priceless, and a reflection of hard work and achievements. Photographs, books, and other personal items have a value to your customers and tenants that cannot be put into words. SERVPRO professionals have the ability to help restore belongings. To your business, there's no such thing as a small fire. Regardless of the size of the event, a fire in one room can damage belongings and surfaces throughout a facility and cause odors that may last for years.

SERVPRO professional understands how events like a fire can disrupt your life. Concerns may range from getting back in business quickly to the expense of replacing tenant's belongings and equipment to the emotions associated with losing a keepsake. Typically restoring an item will save you money versus replacing the item, relieving your tenant's or customer's concern of losing a priceless treasure. SERVPRO consist of a 24-Hour emergency response team, trained in caring for both property and belongings. By responding quickly and help protect property and personal belongings.

Before you risk doing further damage by attempting to clean up the damage yourself call SERVPRO the fire damage cleanup and restoration professionals 1-866-928-7668

Fire Safety

2/19/2016 (Permalink)

10 Key Fire Safety Tips

Though some fires are unavoidable acts of nature or unpredictable accidents, many fires in the home and workplace are avoidable. The following tips, courtesy of the National Fire Protection Association, can help reduce the likelihood of a fire in your business or home. 

  1. Watch your cooking - Stay in the kitchen if you are frying, grilling or broiling food. Never allow young children around the stove or oven, especially if they are not closely attended. 
  2. Give space heaters space - Keep space heaters at least three feet from anything. 
  3. Smoke outside - If you must smoke inside, have a sturdy, deep ashtray. Never smoke in bed.
  4. Keep matches and lighters out of reach - Keep matches and lighters in high cabinets, preferably under a child lock.
  5. Inspect electrical cord - Replace cords that are cracked, damaged, have broken plugs or have loose connections. 
  6. Be careful when using candles - Keep candles at least on foot from anything that can burn. Blow them out before you leave the room or go to sleep.
  7. Have a fire escape plan- Make a fire escape plan and practice it at least twice a year.
  8. Install smoke alarms - Install alarms on every level of your office or home and inside bedrooms. Interconnect them so they all sound at once.
  9. Test smoke alarms - Test alarms once per month. Replace batteries once per year or as needed.
  10. Install sprinklers - Sprinklers can help maintain and sometimes even extinguish fires, giving your local fire department a better chance of saving your property.

Fire Escape Planning Tips

The following are several tips that could potentially save your life or the life of a loved one should a fire break out in your home or business. 

  • Install a smoke alarm on every level of your home.
  • Test smoke alarm batteries every month and change them at least once a year.
  • Consider installing a 10-year lithium battery-powered smoke alarm. 
  • Practice findings your way out of the house with your eyes closed, crawling or staying low and feeling your way out of the house.
  • Remember to escape first, then notify the fire department. 

Fire and Smoke Clean up

11/18/2014 (Permalink)

This is the "before" photo from that fire damage that SERVPRO of Port Jefferson cleaned.

Recently, SERVPRO of Port Jefferson got a call from a friend of our family. She informed us that her neighbors had a fire in their home the night before and needed some help getting it cleaned up. Upon arriving to the scene of the incident we realized it was going to be a large undertaking, including cleaning many contents, inventorying and disposing of contents, and removing most of the interior walls and fixtures of the house. The smoke damage and odor was so bad that the homeowners were just lucky to be out and safe and have some of their belongings determined to be salvageable. We started working on the house immediately and have been working on cleaning contents and removing smoke odor for almost two weeks now.

SERVPRO of Port Jefferson specializes in:  water remediation, flood mitigation, carpet cleaning, mold removal, fire damage, and smoke clean up, disaster restoration, storm response, and air duct cleaning. SERVPRO of Port Jefferson has been serving all of Long Island -Nassau and Suffolk Counties for over 40 years. We are licensed and insured and have an A+ rating with the better business bureau in restoration and cleaning.

SERVPRO of Port Jefferson 631-476-5300