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How To Prepare For A Winter Storm

1/2/2019 (Permalink)

Tips from the American Red Cross on how to protect your home:

  • Make sure your home heating sources are installed according to local codes and permit requirements and are clean and in working order.
  • Make sure your home is properly insulated. Caulk and weather-strip doors and windowsills to keep cold air out.
  • Install storm windows or cover windows with plastic from the inside to provide an extra layer of insulation to keep cold air out.
  • Consider buying emergency heating equipment, such as a wood- or coal-burning stove or an electric or kerosene heater.  - Stoves must be properly vented and in good working order. Dispose of ashes safely. Keep a supply of wood or coal on hand. - Electric space heaters, either portable or fixed, must be certified by an independent testing laboratory. Plug a heater directly into the wall socket rather than using an extension cord and unplug it when it is not in use. - Use a kerosene heater only if permitted by law in your area; check with your local fire department. Use only the correct fuel for your unit. Properly ventilate the area. Refuel the unit outdoors only, and only when the unit is cool. Follow all of the manufacturer's instructions.
  • Consider storing sufficient heating fuel. Regular fuel sources may be cut off. Be cautious of fire hazards when storing any type of fuel.
  • If you have a fireplace, consider keeping a supply of firewood or coal. Be sure the fireplace is properly vented and in good working order and that you dispose of ashes safely.
  • Consider installing a portable generator, following our safety tips to avoid home fires and carbon monoxide poisoning
  • Consider purchasing flood insurance, if you live in a flood-prone area, to cover possible flood damage that may occur during the spring thaw. Homeowners' policies do not cover damage from floods. Ask your insurance agent about the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) if you are at risk. More information on NFIP is available at www.fema.gov/nfip.

How To Prepare For A Winter Storm

12/31/2018 (Permalink)

 

How to Prepare for a Winter Storm Before it happens….WAY Before

  • Make sure you have a 3 day supply of water (3 gallons per person) and easy to prepare food.  Here is my favorite 72 hour no-prep food kit.
  • Purchase a NOAA Weather Radio so you can stay aware of the situation if your other communication sources are cut off.  Make sure it is battery operated and that you have extra batteries.
  • Make sure you have a good shovel.  You may need to dig yourself out before help gets there.  Or you simply may need to dig out your car!
  • Purchase a supply of flashlights (with batteries) and candles.
  • Clean and inspect your chimney if you have one.  Make sure you have a supply of wood.
  • Make sure you have an ample supply of blankets.  If you power goes out, you will need as many as you can get!
  • Clear rain gutters and repair roof leaks.
  • Have an alternate way of cooking.  A small “camp stove” works well for short-term emergencies.  You may also consider a butane stove which is safe to use indoors (with a cracked window).  Make sure that whatever you choose that you have enough fuel.  Cook in a well-ventilated garage (like with the door open) to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning.
  • Install carbon monoxide alarms in your home.  The risk of carbon monoxide poisoning increasing during winter storms as people turn to alternate heat sources.
  • Learn how to care for frostbite and hypothermia.  Make sure you click on those links and print those out NOW in case your power goes out during a storm.
  • Weatherstrip any drafty doors or windows.
  • Purchase rock salt (or something similar) to help you keep walkways safe.
  • Install good winter tires on your car and make sure the wipers work well.
  • Make sure you have fire extinguishers in your home and that everyone knows how to use them.  House fires are much more common during winter storms as people turn to alternate heat sources.
  • Consider purchasing a good supply of heat packs.
  • Consider purchasing a kerosene heater.  Make sure it is legal in your area.

Credit: Simple Family Preparedness

Tips for Winter Storms

12/27/2018 (Permalink)

Winter storms create a higher risk of car accidents, hypothermia, frostbite, carbon monoxide poisoning, and heart attacks from overexertion. Winter storms and blizzards can bring extreme cold, freezing rain, snow, ice, and high winds. A winter storm can:

  • Last a few hours or several days;
  • Knock out heat, power, and communication services; and
  • Place older adults, young children, and sick individuals at greater risk.

IF YOU ARE UNDER A WINTER STORM WARNING, FIND SHELTER RIGHT AWAY

  • Stay off roads.
  • Stay indoors and dress warmly.
  • Prepare for power outages.
  • Use generators outside only and away from windows.
  • Listen for emergency information and alerts.
  • Look for signs of hypothermia and frostbite.
  • Check on neighbors.

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A WINTER STORM THREATENS:

Prepare NOW

  • Know your area’s risk for winter storms. Extreme winter weather can leave communities without utilities or other services for long periods of time.
  • Prepare your home to keep out the cold with insulation, caulking, and weather stripping. Learn how to keep pipes from freezing. Install and test smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors with battery backups.
  • Pay attention to weather reports and warnings of freezing weather and winter storms. Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.
  • Gather supplies in case you need to stay home for several days without power. Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication. Do not forget the needs of pets. Have extra batteries for radios and flashlights.
  • Create an emergency supply kit for your car. Include jumper cables, sand, a flashlight, warm clothes, blankets, bottled water, and non-perishable snacks. Keep the gas tank full.
  • Learn the signs of, and basic treatments for, frostbite and hypothermia.

Survive DURING

  • Stay off roads if at all possible. If trapped in your car, then stay inside.
  • Limit your time outside. If you need to go outside, then wear layers of warm clothing. Watch for signs of frostbite and hypothermia.
  • Avoid carbon monoxide poisoning. Only use generators and grills outdoors and away from windows. Never heat your home with a gas stovetop or oven.
  • Reduce the risk of a heart attack. Avoid overexertion when shoveling snow.
  • Watch for signs of frostbite and hypothermia and begin treatment right away.
  • Check on neighbors. Older adults and young children are more at risk in extreme cold.

RECOGNIZE AND RESPOND

  • Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.
    • Signs: Numbness, white or grayish-yellow skin, firm or waxy skin
    • Actions: Go to a warm room. Soak in warm water. Use body heat to warm. Do not massage or use a heating pad.
  • Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.
    • Signs: Shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling hands, memory loss, slurred speech, or drowsiness
    • Actions: Go to a warm room. Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin. Keep dry and wrapped up in warm blankets, including the head and neck.
    • www.ready.gov
    • www.SERVPROhicksvilleplainview.com

Helpful tips on what to do until help arrives....

12/21/2018 (Permalink)

Fire & Smoke Damage:

Do:

  • Limit movement in the building to prevent soot particles from being embedded into upholstery and carpets.
  • Keep hands clean. Soot on hands can further soil upholstery, walls and woodwork.
  • Blow or brush vacuum loose soot particles from upholstery, drapes and carpets.
  • Place clean drop cloths on rugs, upholstery and carpet traffic areas.
  • If electricity is off, empty freezers and refrigerators completely and prop doors open
  • Clean and protect chrome on cafeteria and bathroom faucets, trim and appliances with light coating of Vaseline or oil.
  • Wash plants on both sides of leaves.
  • Change HVAC filter
  • Tape double layers of cheesecloth over air registers.

Don't:

  • Attempt to wash any walls or painted surfaces without first contacting your SERVPRO of Port Jefferson Professional.
  • Attempt to shampoo carpet or upholstered furniture without first consulting your SERVPRO of Port Jefferson Professional.
  • Attempt to clean any electrical equipment that may have been close to fire, heat or water without first consulting an authorized repair service.
  • Turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet. Wiring may be wet or damaged.
  • Send drapes to ordinary dry cleaner. Improper cleaning may set smoke odor.

Vandalism Damage:

Do:

  • Hose or wash egg damage from building exterior as soon as possible
  • Blot freshly spilled food from carpets and fabrics with dampened cloth or sponge (but don't over wet). Scrape and blot (don't rub: it may damage fibers).
  • Vacuum glass particles from carpets and upholstery.
  • Save containers, which reveal the composition of spilled inks, cosmetics and paints.

Don't:

  • Attempt to remove ink, paint or cosmetics stains.
  • Operate damaged lamps or appliances.
  • Discard wood chips, broken pieces from furniture, porcelain or other art objects.

Harmful Waste (Sewage, Blood borne Pathogens, Etc.)

Do:

  • Stay out of affected areas.
  • Call emergency service personnel if the situation is life-threatening.
  • Treat all bodily fluids as if they are contaminated.
  • Turn off the HVAC system if there is a sewage damage

Don't

  • Attempt cleanup of any kind.
  • Touch or handle items that might be contaminated with bodily fluids.
  • Eat, drink, smoke apply cosmetics or handle contact lenses in affected areas.

If exposed to harmful waste, OSHA recommends a post-exposure medical evaluation. Consult your local health department or physician.

Water Damage:

Do:

  • Remove as much excess water as possible by mopping and blotting
  • Wipe excess water from wood furniture after removal of lamps and table top items.
  • Remove an prop wet upholstery for even drying
  • Place aluminum foil or wood blocks between furniture legs and wet carpeting.
  • Turn air conditioning on for maximum drying in summer.
  • Remove oriental rugs or other colored rugs from wet wall to wall carpeting
  • Remove valuable paintings and art objects to a safe, dry place.

Don't:

  • Leave wet fabrics in place; dry as soon as possible.
  • Leave books, magazines or other colored items on wet carpets or floors, especially not on wet concrete floors.
  • Turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet and keep out of rooms where ceilings are sagging from retained water.

Are You Ready?

12/20/2018 (Permalink)

The best way to reduce business interruption is to prepare for it NOW.

Preparation is a key component for making it through any size disaster. The best time to plan for events such as a small water leak, a large fire or an area flood is not WHEN it happens, but well BEFORE it happens. So ask yourself, Are You Ready for Whatever Happens?

BY having SERVPRO of Port Jefferson develop a SERVPRO Emergency Ready Profile for your business, you minimize how water and fire damage can affect your business.

The SERVPRO Emergency Ready Profile provides the critical information needed to begin mitigation and recovery services. And, it's FREE. 

Contact SERVPRO Port Jefferson to arrange a time for an ERP to be prepared for your business. Call today.

Why SERVPRO Port Jefferson is a Better Restoration Company

12/20/2018 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Port Jefferson is a trusted vendor for the insurance industry. We understand your responsibility to provide results to your shareholders, managers and customers.

SERVPRO of Port Jefferson blends customer service and accountability with proven methods of mitigating damage after water and fire losses. The result is 24-hour emergency mitigation, damage restoration, and a quality job file you can use to download and finalize your claim.

Please take a moment to browse our website to learn details of our services and to hear what our many clients have to say about us. We are faster to any disaster and you can be certain we will do our very best to help you and your customer make it "Like it never even happened." Please  Call SERVPRO of Port Jefferson at 631-476-5300 when disaster strikes.

Tips to stay safe this winter season

12/20/2018 (Permalink)

Are you prepared for winter? 

This upcoming winter season the best way to stay safe and warm is to plan ahead...

Install weather stripping . If you can see light around the edges of your doors, you need new weatherstripping. It will save you hundred of dollars in electrical bills. 

Clean out the gutters, repair roof leaks. Removing debris such as acorns leaves and twigs is very important prior to the winter season to prevent ice dams. 

Service the radiator and maintain antifreeze level.

Keep your gas tank at least half full to avoid ice in the tank and fuel lines, and prepare a winter emergency kit to keep in your car in case you become stranded. 

Above all, be ready to check on family and neighbors who are especially at risk from cold weather hazards like young children, older adults, and the chronically ill. 

No one can stop Mother Nature. However, with a little planning, you will be ready when she hits.  

Pet Safety during this holiday season

12/20/2018 (Permalink)

Tips to keep you woof, meow, chirp safe during this festive time

  • Keep electrical cords, lights and candles out of pets' reach. Candles knocked over by and excited or curious paw or wing can pose serious fire hazards
  • Provide calm, private area for pets to retreat. This will give pets a feeling of safety, especially with multiple guests coming through the house. 
  • Remind guests to close all doors to the outside to prevent any potential escape avenues for nervous pets. 

Weather safety for pets

Exposure to winter's dry, cold air and chilly rain, sleet and snow can cause your furry friend to have chapped paws, and itchy flaky skin. 

Preventing Tips

  • Keep your home humidified and towel dry your pet as soon as they come inside.
  • Never shave your dog down to the skin during winter season
  • Wash and dry your pet's feet and stomach to remove ice, salt and chemicals. 
  • Always check for cracks in paw or redness. Petroleum jelly or other paw protectants can be used to help protect from salt and chemical agents. 
  • Feeding them a bit more can help provide much-needed calories.

Remember if it's too cold for you, it's probably too cold for your pet, so keep your animals inside. 

Safe Home For The Holidays

12/12/2018 (Permalink)

Updated November 30, 2018.

The holiday season is here! No matter if you celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa or all three, we’re excited to share in the holiday spirit. It’s easy to get caught up in the festivities, and while you’re busy decorating the house, safety may be one of the last things on your mind.

According to the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), there were 15,000 injuries related to holiday decorations in 2012. Mishaps send about 250 people to the ER daily, with falls, cuts and back strains topping the list of injuries. To ensure you have a safe, healthy, and happy holiday season with your friends and family, here are 12 tips to keep in mind as you deck out your home:

1. Keep live trees away from heat sources.

Place your tree away from fireplaces and heaters, and keep a fire extinguisher near your tree. Live trees are highly flammable, due to needles and sap.

2. Hydrate your tree.

A dried-out tree can catch fire faster than one that has been properly watered. Check the water level every other day to ensure proper hydration. Starting with a green tree is one way to keep it from drying out so quickly.

3. Fake it!

If you buy an artificial tree, make sure it’s labeled “fire resistant.” Fire-resistant trees are less susceptible to catching fire.

4. Don’t burn wrapping paper in the fireplace.

Paper can catch fire very quickly and can cause flash fires. Instead, recycle (or better yet, reuse!) your wrapping paper.

5. Work as a team.

When stringing lights and decorations above your normal reach, make sure you use a proper ladder with someone supporting the base.

6. Double-check your lights for safety.

Replace any lights with frayed wires, broken sockets, and loose connections. The CPSC issued new guidelines for seasonal light safety in 2015, setting a minimum wire size, and standards for strain relief and over-current protection.

7. Power down before you turn in.

Turn off all lights when you go to bed and before leaving the house to avoid a short that could start an electrical fire.

8. Prevent electrical cord damage.

Don’t mount lights in a way that might damage the cords, and avoid using nails or tacks. Use hooks or insulated staples instead.

9. Secure candles.

Keep candles on a sturdy base to prevent tipping. Never leave a lit candle unattended.

10. Use unbreakable ornaments.

If you have fragile ornament, place them out of reach from pets and kids.

11. Skip the fake food.

Avoid decorations that look like candy or food if you have young children — or pets — in the house.

12. Beware of poisonous plants.

While festive, poinsettias are poisonous when eaten, so keep them out of reach of kids and pets.

Happy holidays!

Source:

The One Medical blog is published by One Medical, an innovative primary care practice with offices in BostonChicagoLos AngelesNew YorkPhoenix, the San Francisco Bay AreaSeattle, and Washington, DC.

Any general advice posted on our blog, website, or app is for informational purposes only and is not intended to replace or substitute for any medical or other advice. The One Medical Group entities and 1Life Healthcare, Inc. make no representations or warranties and expressly disclaim any and all liability concerning any treatment, action by, or effect on any person following the general information offered or provided within or through the blog, website, or app. If you have specific concerns or a situation arises in which you require medical advice, you should consult with an appropriately trained and qualified medical services provider.

Baby, It's Cold Outside

11/7/2018 (Permalink)

BABY, IT’S COLD OUTSIDE

As the calendar turns to Fall, and temperatures begin to drop, it’s time to prepare your water pipes to prevent them from freezing and bursting. Most of these problems happen in basements that are poorly insulated and unfinished. The good news is there’s a simple tip to prevent pipes from freezing – space heaters.

By placing one or more space heaters you’ll help to prevent the pipes from freezing and bursting. The heat generated acts as an insulation barrier.  You’ll also save money in the long term. As for attics, wrap the pipes with heat trace tape.

Don’t be a penny wise and a pound foolish when it comes to your thermostat temperature setting. Keep it set at a minimum of 65 degrees throughout the day.

It’s also a very good idea to have your HVAC system checked and inspected by a professional before it gets too late. By practicing common sense maintenance you may prevent a disaster.

Make sure to know where the main water valve is located in case your pipes do freeze so you can turn it off. Turn on all faucets to drain the pipes.

Be proactive. Take preventative steps. By acting now you can save money and lots of headaches.