Recent Posts

5.8.18 Hurricane Prep

5/7/2018 (Permalink)

May 6 -12 is Hurricane Preparedness Week. Do you know what to do? Are you Prepared? 

If a hurricane strikes, you’re going to need supplies not just to get through the storm but for the potentially lengthy recovery period that could follow. Have enough non-perishable food, water and medicine to last each person in your family a minimum of one week. Electricity and water could be out for at least that long. You’ll need extra cash, a battery-powered radio and flashlights. You’ll also need a portable crank or solar powered USB charger to charge your cellphone. For more information on how to be hurricane ready go to following website  https://www.ready.gov/kit

Check it out today! #hurricane ready  

5.7.18 Hurricane Prep

5/7/2018 (Permalink)

The first thing you need to do is find out if you live in a storm surge hurricane evacuation zone or if you’re in a home that would be unsafe during a hurricane. If you are, figure out where you’d go and how you’d get there if told to evacuate. You do not need to travel hundreds of miles. Identify someone, perhaps a friend or relative who doesn’t live in a zone or unsafe home, and work it out with them to use their home as your evacuation destination. Be sure to account for your pets, as most local shelters do not permit them. Put the plan in writing for you and those you care about. Check out https://www.weather.gov/wrn/hurricane-preparedness for more information!

Hurricane Prep. & Insurance

5/7/2018 (Permalink)

Call your insurance company or agent and ask for an insurance check-up to make sure you have enough homeowners insurance to repair or even replace your home. Don’t forget coverage for your car or boat. Remember, standard homeowners insurance doesn’t cover flooding. Whether you’re a homeowner or renter, you’ll need a separate policy for it, and it’s available through your company, agent or the National Flood Insurance Program at www.floodsmart.gov. Act now as flood insurance requires a 30-day waiting period.

National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) policies can be purchased through thousands of insurance agents nationwide. The agent who helps you with your homeowners or renters insurance may also be able to help you with purchasing flood insurance. Here is a list of participating Write Your Own (WYO) companies.

If your insurance agent does not sell flood insurance, you can contact the NFIP Help Center at 800-427-4661. NFIP flood insurance policies can only be purchased for properties within communities that participate in the NFIP.

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Hurricane Safety 5.10.18

5/7/2018 (Permalink)

A hurricane is a powerful tropical cyclone with sustained winds of at least 74 mph that often measures several hundred miles in diameter. All Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastal areas are subject to hurricanes and tropical storms. The Atlantic hurricane season lasts from June through November with the peak season from mid-August to late October.

If you plan to ride out the storm in your home, make sure it is in good repair and up to local hurricane building code specifications. Many of these retrofits do not cost much or take as long to do as you may think. Have the proper plywood, steel or aluminum panels to board up the windows and doors. Remember, the garage door is the most vulnerable part of the home, so it must be able to withstand the winds.

Setup a plan with your community

5/7/2018 (Permalink)

Many Americans rely on their neighbors after a disaster, but there are also many ways you can help your neighbors before a hurricane approaches. Learn about all the different actions you and your neighbors can take to prepare and recover from the hazards associated with hurricanes. Start the conversation now with these Neighbor Helping Neighbor strategies.

https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/prepare/ready.php

Going over steps of prevention can help minimize the recovery efforts and have a speedy recovery.  Everyone needs to be prepared for the unexpected. 

When a community faces a disaster, everyone plays a key role in helping there region recover and rebuild. 

For more information on steps to take during hurricane preparedness week, take a look at the following: https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane 

Cleaning Mold with Bleach is never the answer

5/2/2018 (Permalink)

Chlorine Bleach is often regarded as the answer for stopping mold growth and removing the mold. However, this is a myth. Bleach does not exonerate mold. Here are three reasons why bleach is not the answer to mold, and should never be used to clean a mold contaminated area.

Bleach Loses Effectiveness Over Time

Chlorine bleach can dissipate rapidly, causing the bleach to be less effective. Over time this occurs because chlorine can evaporate and even faster in areas that are above room temperature. When the chlorine disappears, the bleach bottle turns into a bottle of salt water.  

 Bleach can actually contribute to mold growth

Chlorine bleach was made to clean surfaces, therefore can only kill surface bacteria and mold. This is due to bleach’s ion structure, which prevents the chlorine from penetrating porous material such as wood and drywall. When mold grows in porous areas, the enzyme’s roots grow deep within the material, rendering the bleach ineffective of exterminating the mold. The bleach can only remove the green stain from the mold, allowing surface to appear clean. But underneath the surface, the water component of the bleach penetrates and helps the internal roots to continue to grow, causing mold to reappear.

Bleach is Toxic

Bleach emits harmful fumes that pollute the air we breathe and can become harmful to humans and even pets. Over a period of time, inhaling the gases bleach emits can deteriorate the lungs and esophagus lining in addition to the scarring of the respiratory tract, which occurs in earlier stages. Also research shows that household bleach is one of the leading causes of accidental poisonings in the United States.

Is anything lurking in your bathroom?

4/27/2018 (Permalink)

Mold in bathrooms is a common problem in almost every home. Darkness combined with excessive moisture provides the perfect conditions for consistent mold growth. Constantly cleaning and re-caulking, to keep a growth problem under control, can be time consuming and expensive. The best defense against mold is to prevent it from occurring in the first place. Here are a few tips to help  stop mold growth in your bathroom:

  • Run the ventilation fan while you are showering, and leave it on for 15 minutes after. If you don’t have a fan open a window or use a dehumidifier.
  • Use a sponge after a bath or shower to remove some of the excess moisture or a small towel can be used to dry any accumulated water.
  • Try to avoid keeping a ton of things inside of the bath/shower. They can hide mold growth as well as collect water to promote it. Children’s toys are particularly notorious for growing mold, so be sure to dry them as much as possible and clean them regularly.
  • Fix leaky faucets and shower heads.
  • Use a shower curtain that can be put in the washing machine. There are also many mold-resistant liners available.
  • Clean out the shower and wash bathroom rugs regularly.
  • Check for any other signs of mold in the bathroom under the sink, behind the toilet, etc.

If you are consistently experiencing mold in your bathroom regardless of how often you clean you may have a larger hidden problem. Call SERVPRO of Port Jefferson today 631-476-5300

Fire safety for kids: Prepare, practice and prevent

3/19/2018 (Permalink)

  • PREPARE – Reduce the risk of fires in your home by eliminating hazards.

  • PRACTICE – Practice a home fire evacuation plan and general fire safety practices.

  • PREVENT – The Unthinkable.

It takes about two minutes for a small flame to turn into a life threatening fire and just five minutes for a fire to engulf an entire home, according to Ready.gov. Putting in place fire prevention measures to avoid a home fire altogether is the best fire safety practice.

While prevention isn’t a 100 percent guarantee, there are many precautions you can take in your home to reduce fire hazards and keep your kids safe. Follow these recommendations to address common household fire hazards and protect your family from a home fire catching in your home:

  • Don’t overload electric outlets, extension cords or wall sockets. Stringing multiple extension cords together in order to plug several appliances into the same outlet is a bad idea.

  • Reduce clutter. This is especially important in the kitchen, where dish towels, sponges, paper towels, and other items can catch fire if placed too close to a hot stove. But it’s also important in all areas of your home – blankets and clothing piled up against a heat run, for instance, can also pose a fire hazard. As a rule, keep combustible materials at least three feet from the stove burners, and never leave cooking unattended.

  • Don’t leave burning candles unattended. A candle can fall for a multitude of reasons, lighting carpets, curtains or furniture ablaze. This can also happen if a candle is allowed to burn down too low, causing its glass container to break and freeing the flame.

  • Hide all matches and lighters out of reach of young children. Even responsible children can accidentally light a fire if they encounter a lighter or match and try it out of curiosity. It’s best to place these items well out of reach of kids.

  • Always have multiple working fire extinguishers conveniently located in your home. You should always have a fire extinguisher in the kitchen, for instance, as it’s a common location for fires to occur from cooking and other hazards.

  • Replace circuit breakers with arc-fault circuit interrupters. These gadgets pick up on electrical arcs, usually caused by poor insulation or loose wires or connections, and halt them before they lead to fires.

  • Replace electrical outlets. Faulty electrical outlets can be a source of home fires, too. If plugs seem to be loose or fall out, the blades inside may have loosened. Loose blades create excessive heat, which can lead to fires.

  • Give your clothes dryer proper maintenance. Cleaning the lint catcher thoroughly with every load is just the starting point. Over time, lint and other particles can build up in the vent system or dryer cabinet (where the heating element is located) and potentially cause fires. Having your dryer cabinet professionally cleaned every two years can also reduce potential fire risks.

  • Keep an eye on garage safety. Heated garages pose another threat to your home’s safety. If your garage contains a workshop, where even a thin layer of sawdust is present, and a heating appliance – whether a portable kerosene heater, wood stove, coal stove or anything else – there’s a fire risk. Sawdust is easily combustible, so employ a heavy-duty vacuum like a Shop Vac to remove as much sawdust as possible.

For more information check out https://www.safety.com/kids-fire-safety/

May 1st - CE Course

3/8/2018 (Permalink)

New York Insurance

Continuing Education Course

Topic: “Biohazards and Bio-Recovery for Property Insurers”

Presented By: Robkat, Inc.

Provider # NYPO-100256 

Course #NYR-254098

Licensees eligible for credit: BR, PC, C3, PA

3 Credit Hours

Sponsored by: SERVPRO® of Port Jefferson & Hicksville/Plainview

Date:                   May 1, 2018

Time:                  9:00AM – 12:00PM

Location:           Marriott Residence Inn9 Gerhard Road, Plainview, NY 

Course Fee: $60.00 (Waived by SERVPRO®)

Complimentary Continental Breakfast

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN?

  •  Definitions that differentiate bio-hazards and hazardous materials – How lead paint, asbestos, meth lab residues, fungus, bacteria, viruses, human and animal waste, are classified
  • Insurance coverage and limitations involving biohazards and bio-recovery
  • The more frequent types of biohazards that affect industries and occupations
  • How biohazards and hazardous material effects otherwise typical water and fire damage mitigation
  • The human emotional effects of biohazard recovery on families, survivors, and workers
  • How bio-recovery workers are screened, trained, and prepared for bio-events
  • Objectives for a successful bio-recovery
  • Job site and bio-recovery worker safety protocol when exposed to potentially infectious or hazardous materials - What is considered a Bloodborne Pathogen
  • Federal and State regulatory agencies that have oversight of biohazards containment and Transportation
  • What is the ‘Good Samaritan’ rule in biohazard cleanup
  • Accepted bio-recovery protocols and guidelines

Frozen Pipes

2/13/2018 (Permalink)

Freezing air and fluctuating temperatures make your property prone to a water damage resulting from frozen pipes.

When water is exposed to freezing temperatures, it begins to expand resulting in increased water pressure and a possible pipe burst. Water damages incurred from pipe bursts often result in a fairly significant amount of damage in both residential and commercial properties. By following a few simple steps you can help prevent such a disaster.

  • Use insulated pipes. They will retain the heat and will not allow temperatures to drop too low. If insulated pipes are not an option, you can cover your pipes using sleeves to maintain safe temperatures during winter.
  • Outdoor water pipes are typically unable to maintain a safe temperature to prevent freezing. It is important that you drain these pipes and shut off the water valve. 

Should you discover a frozen pipe, it is important to take immediate action to help prevent any damage from occurring. There are several ways that you can heat and thaw frozen pipes. First you should conduct a thorough check to ensure the pipe has not burst and is not leaking, you also want to ensure the water is turned off. Then, you want to simply heat up the pipe by using a space heater, heat lamp or hair dryer. Wrapping a frozen pipe in thermostatically controlled heat tape may also help.

SERVPRO of Port Jefferson have been providing damage restoration service all over Long Island for over 30 years. Our highly trained and certified staff understands the stress and worry that comes with a fire or water damage and the disruption it causes your life and home or business.

Our teams are on standby and are ready to respond 24/7/365. No matter how big or small, commercial or residential SERVPRO of Port Jefferson is ready to respond and make it "Like it never even happened."